Identity

Lights, Camera, Action

When you think of glamour and prestige, there few events that match up the awesome impact of the annual Academy Awards. Dazzling presence of celebrities gracing the red carpet. But behind every show-stopping look lies a secret weapon: a personal stylist.

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Just like those A-listers, your image deserves star treatment. Whether you’re walking into a boardroom, a networking event, or even a virtual meeting, your appearance speaks volumes about your professionalism, confidence, and success.

That’s where we come in. Our team of seasoned stylists isn’t just about picking out clothes – we’re here to curate a signature look that captures your essence and commands attention. From head-turning ensembles to subtle yet impactful details, we’ll ensure that every aspect of your appearance is meticulously crafted to reflect your personal brand.

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While brand strategy is often considered to be a tool only used by larger organizations, all businesses–from solopreneurs, artists and creative professionals, to associations and non-profits, and even community leaders–can use a brand strategy to elevate their market presence. 

This Essential Brand Framework is Your Business Roadmap

The Essential Brand Framework below serves as your business roadmap. It is as important, or maybe even more so, than your business plan. The framework helps you define your “wow factor” and then create a consistent messaging strategy to outline and guide all your outreach efforts. 

These guidelines serve as a policy of sorts. A policy promise to your customers, defining what they can expect of your business and you will continuously strive to meet and exceed those expectations. By setting and meeting these expectations, you will build credibility, loyalty and advocacy among your audience. 

Why is a Strong Brand Important?

Why do we need a strong brand? With the skyrocketing number of new businesses entering the marketplace just as average attention spans are plummeting, businesses who want to capture attention must do so in noisier arenas with less time than ever to “make the sale.” While a brand is more than a tagline, a strong tagline underpinning a thoughtful brand can do far more to generate attention than a long-winded elevator pitch. 

The Essential Brand Framework 

How does a business start building their brand? Although every branding and marketing professional has a different approach, I have found that the essential brand framework incurs four core elements.

  • Clarity: Be crystal clear about what you do, what you stand for, who you serve, and what results you generate.  
  • Identity: Define your visuals (yes, this includes your logo) AND the voice of your brand.
  • Strategy: Once you’ve defined your brand high points, its time to build a strategy that details when, where and how you will deploy your message. And how often.
  • Activity: All the thinking, reading, learning, and planning will never replace taking action. You must take action. Every day. Only then can you learn from what you do, and subsequently refine your brand framework from your practical experience.

Clarity

When building a brand strategy, businesses, non-profits, and even individuals must start by being crystal clear about what they do and what results they generate. 

If you aren’t clear about what you do, don’t expect your customers to understand you. If they don’t “get” you, they won’t notice you, they won’t remember you and they won’t buy from you. 

Being clear isn’t always as easy as it sounds.

Many businesses start by defining their “uniqueness,” but forget to tell people what they actually do. On the other hand, others focus strictly on promoting their services, but they don’t remember to tell people about what successes their services drive. 

Your clients must understand WHAT you do and WHY you are the right choice to work with. If you aren’t clear about what you do, customers won’t notice you, they won’t buy from you and they won’t refer your services. 

So start your brand strategy by going back to the basics and answer the following questions.

Brand Purpose

  • What do you do?
  • What’s your business type/category?
  • What’s your niche?
  • What products and services do you offer?
  • What is your tagline, motto and/or About Us statement?
  • What’s your mission
    • What are your core values

Brand Audience

  • Who is your target audience? 
  • What do they want or need? 
  • How do your products address those needs?

Brand Competition

  • Who is your target audience? 
  • What do they want or need? 
  • How do your products address those needs?

Brand Authority

  • Market position: (vs. your competitors)
  • Differentiation 
  • Validation: (Proof of Results) 

Identity

Once you’ve defined what your business stands for and how it stands out, and only then, you will start building an “identity” for your business. 

Business owners should spend at least as much time detailing their brand narrative as they spend designing their logo. 

Yes, your identity includes your logo, as well as the fonts, colors, and visual “mood” that will represent your business. But, and this is a personal soapbox of mine, most businesses do not spend nearly enough time also defining the “voice” of their business. 

Business owners should spend at least as much time detailing their brand narrative as they spend designing their logo.

Consistency, as I’ve already discussed, is critical in building trust. And consistency starts with considering your brand narrative and building thoughtful directions on your tone, voice and editorial guidelines.

Visual Identity

  • Logo
  • Brand colors
  • Fonts
  • Mood board
  • Images and icons

Visual Identity

For some, this brand document is something to be checked periodically (or for some, never), as a way to ensure your logo remains relevant and still meets your needs. .

For me, and I recommend this to all my clients as well, my brand guidelines are my business playbook. In my brand guidelines, I include: 

  • My logo and visual identity
  • My personal profile and my business bio
  • The description of my core products and services
  • My main audience personas, and 
  • An overview of my brand narrative, with a link to my editorial guidelines. 

I refer to this booklet frequently, and I have also replicated it in my Notion project management system. Although I am not generally a fan of maintaining duplicate documents, I do like to have easy access to all my core information, which is easier in Notion. That way, whenever I fill out conference registrations, speaker forms or other business applications, I have my logo AND my written information in a handy place, so I ensure my profile is consistent across all online tools. 

Strategy

Once you’ve defined what your business stands for and how it stands out, and only then, you will start building an “identity” for your business. 

Business owners should spend at least as much time detailing their brand narrative as they spend designing their logo. 

Yes, your identity includes your logo, as well as the fonts, colors, and visual “mood” that will represent your business. But, and this is a personal soapbox of mine, most businesses do not spend nearly enough time also defining the “voice” of their business. 

Yes, your identity includes your logo, as well as the fonts, colors, and visual “mood” that will represent your business. But, and this is a personal soapbox of mine, most businesses do not spend nearly enough time also defining the “voice” of their business. 

Yes, your identity includes your logo, as well as the fonts, colors, and visual “mood” that will represent your business. But, and this is a personal soapbox of mine, most businesses do not spend nearly enough time also defining the “voice” of their business. 

Yes, your identity includes your logo, as well as the fonts, colors, and visual “mood” that will represent your business. But, and this is a personal soapbox of mine, most businesses do not spend nearly enough time also defining the “voice” of their business. 

Activity

Once you’ve defined what your business stands for and how it stands out, and only then, you will start building an “identity” for your business. 

Business owners should spend at least as much time detailing their brand narrative as they spend designing their logo. 

Yes, your identity includes your logo, as well as the fonts, colors, and visual “mood” that will represent your business. But, and this is a personal soapbox of mine, most businesses do not spend nearly enough time also defining the “voice” of their business. 

My Services

Brand Report Card

Perfect for DIY marketers 

If your marketing efforts aren’t delivering their anticipated results, I will review your content and provide feedback on how to tweak your messaging so it best showcases your strengths.

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Brand Narrative

Highlight successes over services

Does your content paint a vivid picture of success? I’ll work with you to identify your unique strengths, and then build a custom content plan for your core web pages.

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Book a Consultation

Personalized Solutions

What are your branding needs? Contact me to for a free, 15-Discovery Call.

I also offer one-on-one mentoring sessions.

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Creating a strong brand framework is a critical step for entrepreneurs looking to build a rock solid business identity. While brand strategy is often considered a tool that only larger organizations use, following a brand strategy can help all businesses–including solopreneurs, artists, non-profits, and even community leaders. In short, the brand framework helps define what you do and how the marketplace should perceive you and share your message.